Freedom of expression

The thing I love most about working in an art gallery is when I get to tell visitors who come in expecting to pay to see the art that it is totally free.

This is exactly as art, in all its forms, should be.

Art should override rudimentary things such as class, gender, race, status etc.

It should be at the very least, something in our society that should be accessible for everyone in the community. It should not be discriminatory. It is a symbol of the freedom of expression that all humans have a right to.

Art can talk to the intangible side of human nature. It can be grotesque, funny, challenging and tragic. It can heal, inspire, and unite members of the public. In its essence, art is all too human.

Unfortunately, in the art field, it becomes all too evident that as much as art is a commodity, an art gallery is a business. Due to the nature of the business, those involved can become blindsided, almost corrupt, forgetting the true and free origins of art.

From my own studies in art, ironically, I have found that plenty of the ‘greats’ of the art world have stemmed from grass-roots origins. Many of these artists were very resourceful working with what little they could afford. The true expression is what is the driving success of most of these works. This expression ignites a bond within the viewer that is priceless.

The emotive aspects of a work of art can refreshingly remind an individual of the truths of life that can be all too often shameful or painful to bring up, reminding the viewer that they are not alone in this world. Human beings can and have shared deep connections using art as a very humbling reminder of the fragility in life.

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